My Articles & Interviews

Unpacking Post-Pandemic Summer Travel Anxiety

Go World Travel Magazine

There is excitement—and anxiety—in the air as we head into what we hope to be the final phase of the pandemic. Masks are falling while vaccinations are on the rise.

We are eating out again and even thinking beyond our own backyard and driveway get-togethers to real vacations!

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Ending stigma around mental health with education, empathy and empowerment

Thrive Global

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health condition in the United States affecting over 40 million adults ages 18 and older. But while highly treatable, only 36.9% of sufferers actually seek treatment. That means almost 20% of the US population is struggling, and only one in three people are comfortable asking for help. Why?

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Preserve and Protect

Thrive Global

The outpouring of support for Naomi Osaka in the hours and days after she pulled out of the 2021 French Open has been both heart-warming and heart-wrenching. It clearly shows that she is not the only athlete who has experienced mental health issues, at the professional or any other level of competition.

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“COVID-19 Consent”: Are we Really going to Get that Close Again?

Elephant Journal

The pandemic has caused anxiety even among people who are not ordinarily anxious.

For those of us who struggle with an anxiety disorder, the COVID-19 scourge has offered entirely new avenues of fear and worry.

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Anxiety and Disordered Eating: How a False Sense of Control Provides Relief

Thrive Global

I had my first panic attack when I was just six years old. It came right after we ate take-out from a new restaurant. Even though everyone else was fine, I was convinced I’d been poisoned.

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Strategies for Panicked Professionals – Reduce Your Anxiety around Reentry and Beyond

CEOWorld Magazine

Have you ever played with a pill in your pocket while sitting in a partner’s office, knowing it’s the only thing between you and a panic attack? Have you ever sat in a client meeting taking your pulse on your wrist under the table to monitor your racing heartbeat? Did you ever hyperventilate at an associate luncheon? Has a Zoom call ever triggered your fight-or-flight response even while you’re sitting in your own house?

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On Overcoming Crippling Anxiety

Law360 Pulse

Holland & Knight LLP senior counsel Wendy Robbins knows firsthand the ups and downs of overcoming crippling anxiety while trying to be a successful attorney, and she released a book in May chronicling her journey to help other people take control of their anxiety.

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Five Things We Can Do to Develop Serenity and Support Each Other During These Anxious Times

Authority Magazine

Limit your exposure to news and social media: Prioritize time to be in nature, be with friends and family without talking about the pandemic, politics or other anxiety-provoking topics. Picking times to check in and creating boundaries around how much media you consume will increase your feelings of well-being.

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Is Your Anxiety Making You A Control Freak

Happiness Series

My anxiety started when I was just six years old. My home life was volatile, so my young brain tried to control everything that might trigger the chaos. I didn’t just try to control my environment—like making sure windows and doors were closed and locked even in the middle of summer. I also tried to control the people in it—especially their emotions. If I could keep everyone happy and within eyeshot, I could control my anxiety.

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What Michelangelo Taught Me About Finding Freedom from Fear and Anxiety

Thrive Global

Two weeks after separating from my first husband, I booked a bus tour through Italy, my first trip alone. Just two years prior, my anxiety, obsessive compulsive and panic attack disorders had become so intense and all-consuming they rendered me agoraphobic. But then I found sufficient help to pick myself up off the floor (literally) and start managing and hiding my symptoms enough to function. I asked for a divorce in part because the relationship didn’t have space for my mental health issues; he didn’t understand and dismissed them, which only made things worse. I realized that in trying to create a picture-perfect life—husband, house, dog, career—to feel safe and hide my secrets, what I’d really created was a prison.

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